| 1 MINUTE READ

Stratasys carbon fiber material for 3D printer line is more functional, lightweight and versatile

Appears in Print as: 'ABS-based thermoplastic for improved functionality, versatility and light weight'


ABS-based carbon fiber material for the Stratasys F123 Series 3D printer line is 15% stronger and 50% stiffer compared to standard ABS.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon
ABS-CF10 material 3D-printed into a weldment fixture.

 

ABS-CF10 offers excellent stiffness for alignment tools like this weldment fixture. Photo Credit: Business Wire

Stratasys Ltd. (Eden Prairie, Minn., U.S. and Rehovot, Israel) introduces a new ABS-based carbon fiber material, FDM ABS-CF10, for its F123 Series 3D printer line, the first composite material for the platform. Formulated for applications such as manufacturing tools, jigs and fixtures, the material is said to make carbon fiber more accessible to the engineering and manufacturing community with high-performance F170, F270 and F370 3D printers.

FDM ABS-CF10’s material properties feature 10% chopped carbon fiber, offering an alternative that is 15% stronger and 50% stiffer compared to standard ABS, without the weight of metal. The carbon fiber material can also be printed with a high degree of accuracy. Further, QSR Support water-soluble material makes 3D printing intricate and complex parts without time-consuming manual support removal possible.

With its FDM ABS-CF10 material, Stratasys is particularly focused on addressing applications in the aerospace, automotive, industrial and recreational manufacturing industries. Parts applications include end effectors used with industrial robots, ergonomic aids such as lift assists and hand tools and alignment fixtures on assembly lines.

The FDM ABS-CF10 material is scheduled to be available in April 2021, and orders are being taken now. Learn more about carbon fiber material for the F123 Series online.

RELATED CONTENT

  • Materials & Processes: Composites fibers and resins

    Compared to legacy materials like steel, aluminum, iron and titanium, composites are still coming of age, and only just now are being better understood by design and manufacturing engineers. However, composites’ physical properties — combined with unbeatable light weight — make them undeniably attractive. 

  • Lightning strike protection strategies for composite aircraft

    Tried-and-true materials thrive, but new approaches and new forms designed to process faster are entering the marketplace.

  • Materials & Processes: Fibers for composites

    The structural properties of composite materials are derived primarily from the fiber reinforcement. Fiber types, their manufacture, their uses and the end-market applications in which they find most use are described.