• PT Youtube
  • CW Facebook
  • CW Linkedin
  • CW Twitter
8/22/2018

TenCate celebrates assembly of thermoplastic composite consortium in Brazil

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

The SPIRIT consortium seeks to collaborate and develop a regional knowledge-base in thermoplastic composite technology for the next generation of aircraft.

TenCate Advanced Composites (Nijverdal, The Netherlands), part of the Toray Group (Tokyo, Japan), is celebrating the assembly of the São Paulo Initiative on Research on Innovative Thermoplastic Composites Solutions (SPIRIT) consortium in São José dos Campos, Brazil.

The SPIRIT consortium was formed in 2017 as a joint initiative between TenCate Advanced Composites and key aerospace suppliers and educational institutes across Brazil, to collaborate and develop a regional knowledge-base in thermoplastic composite technology for the next generation of aircraft. Partners include Embraer, Alltec, Technological Institute of Aeronautics (ITA), Instituto de Aeronáutica e Espaço (IAE), São Paulo State University (UNESP) and the Institute for Technological Research of the State of São Paulo (IPT).

The meeting, hosted by the Holland Innovation Network and the Technological Institute of Aeronautics (ITA), further demonstrates a shared vision between partners to foster a Brazilian center of excellence for thermoplastic composites through the creation of joint R+D programs and knowledge-sharing platform, to stimulate thermoplastic composites adoption.

RELATED CONTENT

  • Fabrication methods

    There are numerous methods for fabricating composite components. Selection of a method for a particular part, therefore, will depend on the materials, the part design and end-use or application. Here's a guide to selection.

  • A350 XWB update: Smart manufacturing

    Spirit AeroSystems actualizes Airbus’ intelligent design for the A350’s center fuselage and front wing spar in Kinston, N.C.

  • Thermoplastic composites: Primary structure?

    Yes, advanced forms are in development, but has the technology progressed enough to make the business case?

Resources