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9/25/2018

CAMX 2018 preview: Gerber Technology

Originally titled 'Cutting optimization software and table'
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Gerber Technology (Tolland, CT, US), Booth F29, is demonstrating its AccuMark and CutWorks software platforms, as well as a GERBERcutter Z1 cutting table equipped with a patented Pivex knife.

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Gerber Technology (Tolland, CT, US), Booth F29, is demonstrating its AccuMark and CutWorks software platforms, as well as a GERBERcutter Z1 cutting table equipped with a patented Pivex knife.

AccuMark offers digital design, collaboration and pattern-making tools. CutWorks offers a design, nesting and cutting solution, and the ability to customize production paths. The GERBERcutter Z1 is a scalable, conveyorized single-ply cutter that provides a configurable range of cutting solutions, vision systems and part identification features. The Z1 at CAMX is be equipped with a Pivex reciprocating blade, which is said to eliminate hangers and reduce waste by minimizing the overcuts Gerber says are typically experienced with a round wheel.

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