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10/4/2018

CAMX 2018 preview: Sumitomo

Originally titled 'PES and high-temperature alloy resins'
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Sumitomo Chemical Advanced Technologies LLC (Novi, MI, US) emphasizes its polyethersulfone (PES), liquid crystal polymer (LCP) and high-temperature alloy resins.

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Sumitomo Chemical Advanced Technologies LLC (Novi, MI, US), a subsidiary of Sumitomo Chemical Co. Ltd. and formerly called Sumika Electronic Materials, is emphasizing its polyethersulfone (PES), liquid crystal polymer (LCP) and high-temperature alloy resins. The company serves as the US base of operations and customer support for Sumitomo Chemical’s photoresist and engineering plastics businesses and is certified to ISO9001:2008 and ISO14001:2004 standards. The company says it maintains dedicated PES polymerization facilities in Chiba and Ehime, Japan, as well as a dedicated micro-level powder grinding facility in Phoenix, AZ, US, to eliminate the possibility of cross-contamination with other polymers and to simplify the supply chain for processors and OEMs. Powders ranging in size from 30 to 500 mm are produced at the Phoenix facility using rotary-classifier grinding mills. Booth G86.

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