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6/1/2019 | 1 MINUTE READ

LAP Laser laser-based camera system for composites fabrication

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LAP Laser (Lüneberg, Germany) has introduced the DTEC-PRO camera system, a laser-based ply-placement vertification system designed to increase efficiency in composites manufacturing for aerospace applications.

LAP Laser (Lüneberg, Germany) has introduced the DTEC-PRO camera system, a laser-based ply-placement vertification system designed to increase efficiency in composites manufacturing for aerospace applications. The company says its DTEC-PRO reduces the calibration time for the proven CAD-PRO laser from minutes to seconds. With a combination of ring flash and infrared camera, DTEC-PRO detects reflective targets and sends their position to the PRO-SOFT software. Workpieces known to the system are identified and automatically calibrated for a substantially faster process in manual composite layup.

According to LAP, companies with mobile applications can benefit from the system's flexibility. Regardless of whether the workpiece or the camera are moved, the laser projection is immediately shifted into the correct position. PRO-SOFT control software supports the “Place & Start” approach: the DTEC-PRO camera function is supported by all current and future PRO-SOFT 5.1 software versions. For existing installations with LAP laser projectors, users can continue to use the interface they are familiar with. A software update is all that is required. 

The company also has introduced its new CAD-PRO Compact, a smaller version of the established CAD-PRO product. Compared to the CAD-PRO, the the CAD-PRO Compact has no fan and light weight. With dimensions of 24 cm x 11 cm x 11 cm, and a weight of 2.8 kg, the CAD-PRO Compact fits in many workspaces.

This technology was on display at JEC World 2019.

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