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7/29/2019

CAMX 2019 exhibit preview: OMAX

Originally titled 'Compact abrasive waterjet'
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OMAX is demonstrating its compact ProtoMAX abrasive waterjet at its CAMX 2019 booth

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OMAX ProtoMAX abrasive waterjet for cutting composites

ProtoMAX abrasive waterjet. Source | OMAX

 

OMAX (Kent, Wash., U.S.) is demonstrating its compact ProtoMAX abrasive waterjet at its CAMX 2019 booth. The ProtoMAX can reportedly cut through nearly any material, including glass-reinforced plastics, carbon fiber and G10 composite. The company says the machine’s compact footprint and comprehensive versatility make it ideal for prototyping and R&D for customer one-offs and proof of concept fabrication. The pump and cutting table are on casters for easy relocation. The machine has a clamshell cover and the work material is submerged under water for safe, quiet cutting, at approximately 76 dB. 

The company says that its abrasive waterjets are ideal for cutting composite materials because they never dull, enabling unlimited machining without time-consuming changeouts of cutting heads or subsequent blemishes on the final product. Since it is a cold cutting process, waterjet cutting also eliminates material distortion from heat and does not produce fumes that some heat-based machining methods can generate.

CAMX 2019 Exhibitor

OMAX Corp.

Exhibit Hall, Booth Y71

View Showroom | Register Here

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