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CAMX 2019 exhibit preview: Izumi International Inc.

Appears in Print as: 'Winders, creels and tensioning devices'


Izumi offers various kinds of winders, creels, warp and weft feeding and tensioning devices for carbon fiber and other critical high-performance fibers.
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composites

Izumi International Inc. (Greenville, S.C., U.S.) was founded in 1977 in Greenville, South Carolina, and established itself by providing cutting-edge technology primarily for the Japanese water jet and air jet weaving machines.

Shortly after opening, Izumi began carrying the winding machines made by Kamitsu Seisakusho Ltd. (Osaka, Japan), for the carbon fiber industries. After nearly 40 years, the company now offers various kinds of winders, creels, warp and weft feeding and tensioning devices for carbon fiber and other critical high-performance fibers in the U.S. and Europe.

In the late 1980’s, Izumi was one of the first distributors for THK Co. Ltd. (Minato, Japan), the leader in linear motion guides. Izumi branched into the automation field, adding aluminum extrusion modular automation systems, and table top and scara robots for factory automation.

Izumi’s newest partnerships are with Musashi Engineering Inc. (Tokyo, Japan), makers of super precision fluid dispensers and Moltec International (Oakville, Ontario, Canada), offering wire and cable protection with the patented Grip Lock technology. In 2013, the company launched a new 3D dispensing robot for bioengineering applications.

Izumi says its mechanical and electrical engineers can assist in selection of a component or completely design a custom machine. The company’s technicians service machinery in the field, install new equipment as well as servicing older machinery. The company also offers light machining capabilities and various forms of cutting.

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