• PT Youtube
  • CW Facebook
  • CW Linkedin
  • CW Twitter
6/21/2019

Meggitt wheels, brakes selected for ATR72 aircraft fleet upgrade

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Meggitt’s heavy-duty wheels and NuCarb carbon/carbon brakes are said to provide improved performance and reliability for the ATR72 fleet.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

 

carbon/carbon brakes ATR72 aircraft

Source | Meggitt

 

Meggitt PLC (Christchurch, Dorset, U.K.) has been selected by ATR Aircraft (Paris, France) to provide brake and wheel upgrades for the current and future global ATR72 fleet.

Fifteen airline operators have committed to operate 185 ATR72 aircraft with upgraded Meggitt equipment, of which 64 already have been installed with Meggitt’s heavy-duty wheels and NuCarb carbon/carbon brakes.

The enhancements are said to provide improved performance and reliability for the ATR72 aircraft’s increased gross take-off weight, and will bring significant operating cost, reliability and turnaround time improvements. NuCarb carbon technology is produced in Danville, Kentucky, U.S., at what Meggitt says is one of the world’s most modern aerospace carbon brake manufacturing facilities.

Meggitt will support ATR’s ability to provide General Maintenance Agreements (GMAs) to operators of Meggitt’s heavy-duty brake.

“Meggitt has a long-standing relationship with ATR going back almost 40 years, and we are proud to continue to support the turboprop maker, and its operators, on a global basis,” says Tony Wood, chief executive of Meggitt. “The selection of Meggitt’s NuCarb technology for the ATR72 further underlines the performance and operating cost benefits of our innovative aircraft braking system technology.”

RELATED CONTENT

  • Fabrication methods

    There are numerous methods for fabricating composite components. Selection of a method for a particular part, therefore, will depend on the materials, the part design and end-use or application. Here's a guide to selection.

  • Ceramic-matrix composites heat up

    Lightweight, hard and stable at high temperatures, CMCs are emerging from two decades of study and development into commercial applications.

  • Composites 101: Fibers and resins

    Compared to legacy materials like steel, aluminum, iron and titanium, composites are still coming of age, and only just now are being better understood by design and manufacturing engineers. However, composites’ physical properties — combined with unbeatable light weight — make them undeniably attractive. 

Related Topics

Resources