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12/12/2018

Chase Plastics partners with Interfacial on resin solutions

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The new venture focuses on exploring the ability to create and develop custom materials including sustainable materials, advanced composites and specialty compounds.

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Resin distributor Chase Plastics (Clarkson, MI, US) announced Dec. 6 the formation of a new supplier partnership with Interfacial (River Falls, WI, US), a company focused on the development and commercialization of technology platforms relating to advanced materials and manufacturing processes for the plastics and composites industry.

The new venture focuses on exploring the ability to create and develop custom materials — including sustainable materials, advanced composites and specialty compounds — to fill the void where there may not be an existing material solution.

“The targeted opportunities are those that are deemed unattainable by other manufacturers and specialty compounders,” says Adam Paulson, vice president of Chase Plastics. “Chase Plastics and Interfacial work together to make the impossible possible or to turn an idea into reality via pushing the limits on thermoplastics and composites.” 

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