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9/13/2018

CAMX 2018 preview: OMAX

Originally titled 'Compact waterjet for range of composite materials'
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OMAX Corp. (Kent, WA, US) is highlighting its versatile ProtoMAX waterjet, which can cut through a range of materials including fiberglass, phenolic, fiber laminate, carbon fiber and G10 composite.

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OMAX Corp. (Kent, WA, US) is highlighting its versatile ProtoMAX waterjet, which can cut through a range of materials including fiberglass, phenolic, fiber laminate, carbon fiber and G10 composite. The machine’s compact footprint and versatility is said to make it ideal for prototyping, educational applications or as a complement to a larger machine shop. The waterjet’s pump and cutting table are on casters for easy relocation. It has a clamshell cover and submerges the work material underwater for safe, quiet cutting at approximately 76 db. The waterjet delivers 30,000-psi cutting power with a 5-hp pump. It cuts with no-heat-affected zone and no change to material properties. The waterjet plugs into a 240V AC dryer-style outlet and does not require hardwiring. ProtoMAX is controlled by OMAX’s Intelli-MAX Proto software. Software comes pre-installed on an included laptop and is said to simplify the conversion of drawings to cutting paths. Booth K30.

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