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CAMX 2017 preview: Mokon

Mold heating and cooling specialist Mokon (Buffalo, NY, US) is exhibiting its Full Range temperature control system, which  integrates either a water or an oil heating system with a select chiller, providing a compact, self-supporting heating and cooling system in one unit.

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Mold heating and cooling specialist Mokon (Buffalo, NY, US) is exhibiting its Full Range temperature control system, which  integrates either a water or an oil heating system with a select chiller, providing a compact, self-supporting heating and cooling system in one unit. These systems are available with a range of temperatures from -29°C to 315°C. The Full Range system is said to be suitable for applications including jacketed vessels, mixers, reactors, molding, multiple-zone processes, laboratories, clean room and sanitary environments. Systems are available with air- or water-cooled condensing, up to 96 kW of heating, flows to 120 GPM/454 LPM, and up to 40 tons (140 kW) chilling capacity. Full Range Systems are also available with NEMA 4, NEMA 4X or special wash down demands. A variety of additional options and features are available, including stainless steel construction, higher and lower operating temperatures, larger heating and chilling capacities and stationary skid-based assemblies. Booth S48.

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