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CAMX 2017 preview: Imetrum

Noncontact precision measurement specialist Imetrum (Bristol, UK) is demonstrating its integrated material testing system, Universal Video Extensometer (UVX), designed for ease of use and fast throughput.
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Noncontact precision measurement specialist Imetrum Ltd. (Bristol, UK) is demonstrating its integrated material testing system, Universal Video Extensometer (UVX), designed for ease of use and fast throughput. UVX meets most standards-based material testing and is adaptable to batch testing. It is designed to integrate with all leading manufacturers’ test machines and is characterized as a cost-effective alternative to strain-gauging coupons. In addition, measurement data is captured by pre-calibrated extensometer modules that are specified by gage length and percentage strain. Parameters associated with each module are pre-set, eliminating need for the test technician or materials engineer to understand optics or worry about focus and camera setting. The 200 and 250 series modules allow precision measurements down to 0.01% strain. These modules are suited to determining modulus, Poisson’s ratio, and other low-strain material properties such as R and N values, for almost all materials including composites, metals, plastics, rubbers and ceramics. Booth C48.

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