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CAMX 2017 preview: DUNA-USA

DUNA-USA Inc. (Baytown, TX, US) is debuting its BLACK CORINTHO HT 800 high- temperature tooling board, which offers low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) at temperatures up to 400°F, coupled with high thermal conductivity for reducing oven and autoclave cycle times.
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DUNA-USA Inc. (Baytown, Texas) is debuting its BLACK CORINTHO HT 800 high- temperature tooling board, which offers low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) at temperatures up to 400°F, coupled with high thermal conductivity for reducing oven and autoclave cycle times.

In addition to standard and high-temperature tooling boards, DUNA-USA also is showcasing its high-temperature sealers and adhesives. DUNA-USA also says that BLACK CORINTHO HT 800 offers excellent machinability and easier handling than traditional metal tooling, making it a cost-effective alternative for low-volume prototypes and composite layup tools. DUNA-USA also manufactures the CORAFOAM line of polyurethane tooling boards, with densities from 4-31 lb/ft3. Known for its ultrasmooth surface and ability to produce chips instead of dust, CORAFOAM applications include composite layup tooling, vacuum forming, prototyping, and CAD verification tools.

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