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JEC World 2018 preview: Evonik

Evonik Industries is introducing a new core material technology called ROHACRYL, an acrylic chemistry-based structural foam with high potential for composite applications.
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Evonik Industries (Hall 5, J40) is introducing a new core material technology called ROHACRYL, an acrylic chemistry-based structural foam with high potential for composite applications. ROHACRYL foam is said to offer good mechanical properties and is thermally stable. It is reportedly also lightweight, easy to shape and environmentally friendly. Evonik says that driving initial development of ROHACRYL was the wind energy industry trend toward longer turbine blades that must meet demanding requirements. Multiple material solutions in the market offered either high mechanical properties or withstood a high curing temperature, but not until the introduction of ROHACRYL foam, says Evonik, has a core material solution offered both in a single product.

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