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TPI and Navistar to build all-composite Class 8 truck

Class 8 truck comprised of a composite tractor and frame rails will result in an estimated 30% reduction in weight and improve freight efficiency.

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TPI Composites, Inc., (Scottsdale, AZ, US), announced March 8 that it has entered into an agreement with Navistar, Inc. (Lisle, IL, US) to design and develop a Class 8 truck comprised of a composite tractor and frame rails. This collaborative development project is being entered into in connection with Navistar’s recent award under the US Department of Energy’s Super Truck II investment program, which is designed to promote fuel efficiency in commercial vehicles.

“We are excited about the opportunity to design, develop and validate the use of composite materials and technologies in commercial vehicles in a cost effective and high volume manufacturing environment,” says Steve Lockard, president and CEO of TPI.

With 80% of all goods in the United States transported by Class 8 trucks, there is a significant opportunity to improve the freight efficiency of trucks. Incorporating composite materials into a Class 8 truck structure offers multiple performance advantages compared to traditional metals in terms of weight savings, reduced part count, and non-corrosion properties. TPI and Navistar are targeting 30% plus reduction in the weight of a Class 8 truck by replacing traditional metals with composite materials to enhance the freight efficiency.

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