• PT Youtube
  • CW Facebook
  • CW Linkedin
  • CW Twitter
9/13/2018 | 1 MINUTE READ

CAMX 2018 preview: L&L Products

Originally titled 'Room-temperature cure adhesives for aerospace, automotive'
Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

L&L Products (Romeo, MI, US) is presenting its room-temperature cure adhesives for applications that require fire and smoke and toxicity performance.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

L&L Products (Romeo, MI, US) is presenting its room-temperature cure adhesives for applications that require fire and smoke and toxicity performance. Booth N21. Two new adhesives include L-9150 and L-9115. L-9150 is a two-component adhesive with a 1:1 mix ratio, which cures at room temperature or can be accelerated with heat. It provides high-performance bonding (work life 35-50 minutes). L-9115 is a two-component, toughened adhesive that cures at room temperature and provides high-performance bonding (work life 10-20 minutes). Both adhesives are designed for aerospace interior applications and meet the FAA fire regulations (vertical burn, smoke density and toxicity). Also in the L&L Products booth is the company’s newest technology, Continuous Composite Systems (CCS), which combines highly engineered sealants and adhesives with a fiber-reinforced composite carrier in a two-dimensional profile designed to provide strength, stiffness and rigidity in a lightweight structure. Also new from L&L Products is a structural adhesive foam, L-5920, an epoxy-based structural foam with higher strain to failure than traditional structural foams. It is commonly paired with a reinforcing material such as nylon and then designed to create an engineered structural insert. The heat-activated foaming structural material is intended for crash applications with improved strain to failure and modulus (strain energy). L-5920 has a higher vertical rise at the same volumetric expansion than its Generation 3 predecessor, L-5520, meaning it is capable of spanning larger gaps and achieving adhesion more quickly during heat exposure and thereby producing more durable bonding.

 

RELATED CONTENT

  • Taking the hand out of hand layup

    Hand layup has a long history in aerospace composites fabrication, but it's not well suited for automotive composites manufacturing, where volumes are much higher. But the discrete placement of fiber reinforcements still has value. Research is pointing toward automated hand layup that might help this process bridge the aerospace-to-automotive divide.

  • Additive manufacturing comes to composites fabrication

    The use of continuous fiber in additive manufacturing systems is not trivial, but it is being done. As this fabrication technology evolves and matures, options for applying it in everything from automotive to aerospace to consumer composites will expand tremendously, creating a host of new opportunities for the composites industry. Read here for who is providing what kind of additive manufacturing technology for use in composites fabrication.

  • Is the BMW 7 Series the future of autocomposites?

    BMW AG's Dingolfing, Germany, auto manufacturing facility is well known for churning out a variety of car models and types, and the 7 Series is among them, famous for its steel/aluminum/composites construction. Does this car represent the optimum of composites use in vehiicles? This plant tour of the Dingolfing plant looks at how composites on the 7 Series come together.


Resources