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9/13/2018

CAMX 2018 preview: Eastman Machine

Originally titled 'Cutting table with automated ply stacking'
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Eastman Machine Co. (Buffalo, NY, USA) is showing the Talon 25x cutting table, designed to automatically pull stacked material plies from the spreading table to a modular, bristle-block conveyor bed for reciprocating knife cutting of up to 1.18 inches/30 mm of compressed material goods.

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Eastman Machine Co. (Buffalo, NY, USA) is showing the Talon 25x cutting table, designed to automatically pull stacked material plies from the spreading table to a modular, bristle-block conveyor bed for reciprocating knife cutting of up to 1.18 inches/3 cm of compressed material goods. High-speed, precision cutting demonstrations of fiberglass, fiberglass insulation, aramid and other technical textiles are being featured. The Talon features a quick-change cutting knife and single-coated diamond sharpening disk to provide a robust cutting edge. It also features the company’s Recipro-Cool Drive Assembly, an internal crank cooling system engineered to reduce heat and wear/tear to the horizontal crank mechanism that drives the knife up and down. The Talon is optionally available with a cutting capacity of 3 inches/7.5 cm, several widths and a variety of vacuum blower configurations. The system also offers what is said to be easy access to the knife system and assembly parts, to help simplify daily maintenance procedures. Booth 3331.

 

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