Zone: Thermoplastics
CompositsForCabin.jpg Overview

In contrast to crosslinking thermosets, whose cure reaction cannot be reversed, thermoplastics harden when cooled but retain their plasticity; that is, they will remelt and can be reshaped by reheating them above their processing temperature. Less-expensive thermoplastic matrices offer lower processing temperatures but also have limited use temperatures. They draw from the menu of both engineered and commodity plastics, such as polyethylene (PE), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polybutylene terephthalate (PBT), polycarbonate (PC), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), polyamide (PA or nylon) and polypropylene (PP). High-volume commercial products, such as athletic footwear, orthotics and medical prostheses, benefit from the toughness and moisture resistance of these resins, as do automotive air intake manifolds and other underhood parts.


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Most Recent Content: Thermoplastics
Thermoplastic composites: Primary structure?

Yes, advanced forms are in development, but has the technology progressed enough to make the business case?
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Additive manufacturing: Can you print a car? CompositesWorld

Collaborative demonstration dispels doubt about 3D printing’s disruptive potential for direct-to-digital manufacturing of just about anything BIG.

Victrex to open innovation center CompositesWorld

The new Polymer Innovation Center in northern England will create 80 jobs and could result in as much as US$25 million investment.

Autocomposites Update: Engine oil pans CompositesWorld

As thermoplastic composites makes inroads into these complex, modular parts, weight and cost go down, functionality goes up.

Looking for Lindberghs CompositesWorld

Every paradigm-shifting invention throughout human history has been met with skepticism. CW editor-in-chief Jeff Sloan says the composites industry has need of those willing to attempt what most believe impossible.

Incremental thinking just won’t cut it! CompositesWorld

Composites industry consultant and regular CW columnist Dale Brosius says if this industry is to have a future that goes anywhere profitable, then we've got to get off the road we're on and map out a whole new way to think about the tasks at hand.

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