Thermoplastics

In contrast to crosslinking thermosets, whose cure reaction cannot be reversed, thermoplastics harden when cooled but retain their plasticity; that is, they will remelt and can be reshaped by reheating them above their processing temperature. Less-expensive thermoplastic matrices offer lower processing temperatures but also have limited use temperatures. They draw from the menu of both engineered and commodity plastics, such as polyethylene (PE), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polybutylene terephthalate (PBT), polycarbonate (PC), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), polyamide (PA or nylon) and polypropylene (PP). High-volume commercial products, such as athletic footwear, orthotics and medical prostheses, benefit from the toughness and moisture resistance of these resins, as do automotive air intake manifolds and other underhood parts.
PEEK or PEKK in future composite aerostructures?
Features

PEEK or PEKK in future TPC aerostructures?

Which is better for in-situ consolidated thermoplastic composite primary structures? Materials play a part as to whether a one-step or two-step process will prevail.
Features

Thermoplastic composites: Past the tipping point?

The manufacturing world watched a decade ago as automatically placed thermoset composite tapes replaced aluminum in commercial airframes and made composites a household word in markets around the world. Has the time come for thermoplastic composite tapes to make a similar impact?
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New Product Announcements
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New high-performance pipes for oil and gas industry from KraussMaffei

KraussMaffei has announced two pipe extrusion technologies including a new thermoplastic composite pipes pilot line and a three-layer pipe with a functional inner layer made of polyamide.