Thermoplastics

In contrast to crosslinking thermosets, whose cure reaction cannot be reversed, thermoplastics harden when cooled but retain their plasticity; that is, they will remelt and can be reshaped by reheating them above their processing temperature. Less-expensive thermoplastic matrices offer lower processing temperatures but also have limited use temperatures. They draw from the menu of both engineered and commodity plastics, such as polyethylene (PE), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polybutylene terephthalate (PBT), polycarbonate (PC), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), polyamide (PA or nylon) and polypropylene (PP). High-volume commercial products, such as athletic footwear, orthotics and medical prostheses, benefit from the toughness and moisture resistance of these resins, as do automotive air intake manifolds and other underhood parts. They are increasingly being used in high-performance applications in aerospace and other fields.
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The markets: Pressure vessels (2019)

High-pressure gas storage vessels represent one of the biggest and fastest-growing markets for advanced composites.

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The markets: Automotive (2019)

As the global auto industry hurtles toward its confrontation with US fuel economy and European Union (EU) emissions standards in 2017, the pressure built to find more radical solutions to lightweighting.

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EconCore thermoplastic honeycomb panel production technology

EconCore’s ThermHex honeycomb technology converts thermoplastics to high-performance, lightweight honeycomb core structures and, combined with inline lamination of skins, produces lightweight sandwich panels.