Thermoplastics

In contrast to crosslinking thermosets, whose cure reaction cannot be reversed, thermoplastics harden when cooled but retain their plasticity; that is, they will remelt and can be reshaped by reheating them above their processing temperature. Less-expensive thermoplastic matrices offer lower processing temperatures but also have limited use temperatures. They draw from the menu of both engineered and commodity plastics, such as polyethylene (PE), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polybutylene terephthalate (PBT), polycarbonate (PC), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), polyamide (PA or nylon) and polypropylene (PP). High-volume commercial products, such as athletic footwear, orthotics and medical prostheses, benefit from the toughness and moisture resistance of these resins, as do automotive air intake manifolds and other underhood parts.
Features

Styrene ≠ polystyrene: An important distinction for composites

Definitions are important when discussing technology. Although often used interchangeably, the terms styrene and polystyrene refer to different materials.
Features

How is tow spread?

ITA characterizes tow spreading processes and parameters as it develops new technology to speed production (100 m/min) and reduce width variation (<1mm).
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New Product Announcements
New Product

Asahi Kasei launches Thermylene P11

Next-generation family of glass-reinforced polypropylene (PP) compounds opens new opportunities for thinwall molding of interior and exterior automotive parts.