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Victrex launches PEEK polymer for cryogenics

Appears in Print as: 'PEEK polymer designed for cryogenic temperatures'


VICTREX CT 200 is designed for dynamic sealing applications where gases such as liquefied natural gas (LNG) are stored and transported at cryogenic temperatures.
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Victrex (Thornton Cleveleys, UK) has introduced VICTREX CT 200, a high-performance polyetheretherketone (PEEK) polymer designed for dynamic sealing applications where gases such as liquefied natural gas (LNG) are stored and transported at cryogenic temperatures (-150°C/-238°F to -200°C/-328°F). According to Victrex, its 200 grade series polymers exhibit improved sealing over a wider range of temperatures when compared to commonly used materials such as PCTFE. The resin reportedly does so at low temperatures because of its good ductility, and at high temperatures due to its good creep resistance. VICTREX CT polymers also have been reportedly shown to maintain better dimensional stability, with a lower coefficient of thermal expansion, than incumbent material. The higher thermal conductivity of these polymers is said to enable a fast response to temperature changes and ensure the material is engaged with the counter-surface at all times. According to Victrex, laboratory testing indicates that the polymers also may require less torque to actuate since they have a lower static and dynamic coefficient of friction compared to PCTFE, resulting in less wear and higher performance.

 

 

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