• PT Youtube
  • CW Facebook
  • CW Linkedin
  • CW Twitter
7/14/2014

Soluble plastic tooling cores

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Soluble plastic tooling cores reportedly offer lighter parts for aerospace and automotive applications.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Stewart Group Holdings (Banbury, Oxfordshire, U.K.) is a U.K. manufacturer of technical plastic molded products for the automotive, industrial, professional catering, packaging, home and gardening sectors. Its Stewart Technical division, which provides bespoke technical molding for the aerospace, automotive, medical and other industries, claims to be the first Tier 1 supplier in the world to create tooling molds from soluble plastics. Having tested this new process extensively, the company says it offers advanced production capability for lightweight, hollow carbon fiber and fiber-reinforced parts. Stewart Group Holdings explains that soluble plastics offer advantages over traditional molding methods: Wax and sand cores are notoriously messy and require disposal, while wooden cores must be burned out. With soluble plastic, once the final product has been cured, the core simply washes away. Traditional plastic cores are left inside the hollow section, which also adds to the final component weight.

RELATED CONTENT

  • Fabrication methods

    There are numerous methods for fabricating composite components. Selection of a method for a particular part, therefore, will depend on the materials, the part design and end-use or application. Here's a guide to selection.

  • CAMISMA’s car seat back: Hybrid composite for high volume

    Recycled fibers, in-situ polymerized PA12 and steel inserts combined in one-shot process to cut weight 40 percent at competitive cost, cycle time and safety.

  • Thermoformable Composite Panels, Part II

    Preconsolidated sheet stock for load-bearing applications features continuous fiber - not only glass, but carbon and aramid as well.

Resources