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1/9/2014

Optically clear, toughened two-part epoxy

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Master Bond Inc. has introduced EP38CL, a two-part adhesive developed for bonding, sealing, coating and encapsulation applications that require toughness and durability.

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Master Bond Inc. (Hackensack, N.J.) has introduced EP38CL, a two-part adhesive developed for bonding, sealing, coating and encapsulation applications that require toughness and durability. With a Shore D hardness exceeding 75, its toughness reportedly helps it resist rigorous thermal cycling, impact and m chanical shock. EP38CL cures at room temperature, or more quickly at elevated temperatures, and exhibits low cure shrinkage. It has a 100:60 mix ratio, by weight, and a working life of 40 to 50 minutes. It bonds well to composites, metals, ceramics, glass and many rubbers and plastics. EP38CL features a tensile lap shear strength of 2,500 psi/17.2 MPa, a compressive strength of 8,000 psi/55.2 MPa and a tensile strength of 7,500 psi/51.7 MPa at room temperature. It is optically clear with a glossy appearance and is serviceable from -60°F to 250°F (-51°C to 121°C). The product’s packaging options range from 0.5 pint to 5-gal kits, plus premixed and frozen syringes. 

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