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8/1/2012

Hot-water temperature control systems

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SINGLE Temperiertechnik GmbH introduced at JEC Europe 2012 hot-water temperature control systems for molds rated up to 225°C/437°F.

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SINGLE Temperiertechnik GmbH (Hochdorf, Germany) introduced at JEC Europe 2012 hot-water temperature control systems for molds rated up to 225°C/437°F. The systems are touted as technically superior and more energy efficient than hot-oil and electric heaters and ovens. The company claims that its fluid-based mold-temperature control offers many benefits that are not available with oven curing. The latter complicates part handling, is highly time consuming and makes process control difficult to manage. Further, an oven’s cooling phase offers no room for active support. In the case of thermoplastic composites, the molding process can benefit from active alternating temperature technology (ATT), recommended for processes that require fast temperature variations within the cycle time. Reportedly within seconds, ATT can switch between two circuits with cooling fluids of different temperatures either to heat or cool the mold. This ensures adequate cooling during the filling phase and sufficient heat during the curing phase.  

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