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9/2/2012

Hard armor unidirectional fiber

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The latest hard armor product for wheeled vehicles from Teijin Aramid, Twaron UD21, is designed to provide a low-weight barrier that provides a high level of protection against projectiles, mines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs), at temperatures up to 90°C/194°F.

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The latest hard armor product for wheeled vehicles from Teijin Aramid (Arnhem, The Netherlands), Twaron UD21, is designed to provide a low-weight barrier that provides a high level of protection against projectiles, mines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs), at temperatures up to 90°C/194°F. Intended to protect soldiers against direct hits from bullets, fragments and other projectiles, Twaron UD21 can be applied either internally as a spall liner on an OEM structure, such as a wheeled vehicle, or externally as part of bolt-on or add-on armor. For extra strength and performance, Twaron UD21 can be combined with other materials, such as steel, ceramics or titanium. It consists of two layers of unidirectional Twaron fiber plied in a 0°/90° configuration. In each layer, smart UD technology aligns the Twaron fibers in parallel, and each layer is individually constructed within the resin matrix. Twaron UD21 has been subjected to a wide range of testing and offers protection according to North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) armored vehicle standards (STANAG 4569, levels 1-4).  

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