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3/24/2017 | 1 MINUTE READ

Graco offers dispense analyzer monitoring system

Originally titled 'Fluid dispense analysis system'
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Graco Advanced Fluid Dispense (AFD, North Canton, OH, US) has introduced the Graco Dispense Analyzer monitoring system for detecting errors in material dispense for a wide variety of applications.

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Graco Advanced Fluid Dispense (AFD, North Canton, OH, US) has introduced the Graco Dispense Analyzer monitoring system for detecting errors in material dispense for a wide variety of applications. Graco Dispense Analyzer, which tracks and monitors each dispense “signature” with a degree of precision reportedly higher than other approaches, including vision-reliant inspection systems. The system uses a variety of sensor data to define a dispense signature, and then determines whether each dispense has been completed in accordance with the signature, such that it will result in a good part. If the dispense signature is outside of defined parameters, the Dispense Analyzer can provide actionable information to define a course of action – rework, retouch, or scrap. It can record and analyze the signature for each dispense, and can detect defects associated with air bubbles, bead size, dispense pressure, flow rate, consistency, and temperature of dispense, as well as a variety of custom attributes. If a problem is found in finished parts, users can return to stored data to identify the root cause and use waveform analysis to more accurately determine how to correct it. When required for quality or regulatory purposes, end users can quickly and easily retrieve detailed data stored by the Graco Dispense Analyzer.

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