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11/12/2019

Epoxy toughening agent enhances adhesion for automotive applications

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CVC Thermoset Specialties’ HyPox RA875 epoxy adduct toughening agent is said to enable improved peel strength at room temperature and temperatures down to -40°C.

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CVC Thermoset Specialties (Moorestown, N.J., U.S.), an Emerald Performance Materials company, has launched HyPox RA875, its newest carboxyl-terminated acrylonitrile-butadiene (CTBN) epoxy adduct toughening agent. HyPox RA875 is said to enable improved peel strength at room temperature and temperatures down to -40°C, as well as enhanced adhesion to oily substrates when compared to core-shell rubber (CSR).

According to CVC Thermoset Specialties, automotive structural adhesives formulated with HyPox RA875 demonstrate improved adhesion to the oily substrates common to automotive applications. HyPox RA875 is also said to reduce rejections due to adhesive failure, improving production.

In addition, HyPox RA875 is designed to strengthen adhesives by maintaining properties of high crosslink density, such as high modulus and failure strength, excellent adhesive strength and low creep, while reducing the brittleness of the epoxy.

HyPox RA875 is part of CVC Thermoset Specialties’ line of elastomer-modified epoxy resins designed to merge the benefits of CTBN-toughened chemistry with the convenience of conventional 1- or 2-part epoxy handling and performance.

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