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7/23/2009

Epoxy bonding and tooling materials

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BCC Products Inc./Blehm Plastics has developed BC5009, a new low-viscosity epoxy adhesive/laminating resin for tooling and part bonding. Also new is the MB Series of tooling boards.

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BCC Products Inc./Blehm Plastics (Franklin, Ind.) has developed BC5009, a new, low-viscosity epoxy adhesive/laminating resin for tooling and part bonding. An unfilled, room-temperature-cure system, it has a 30-minute pot life and is reportedly easy to apply by brush or trowel to bond tooling/modeling boards and mid- to large-sized epoxy parts. A color indication system provides a visual sense of proper mix ratio: a green hardener and amber resin, when mixed to the proper ratio, cure to a light translucent amber.  Also new: The MB line of tooling boards for short- to intermediate-run vacuum forming and prototyping tools. MB3000 Modeling Board reportedly cuts with little dust and is said to reduce wear on cutting tools. MB3500 Fixture Board (in grey, white and yellow for verification tool applications) is said to offer good dimensionality and cutting and is suitable for vacuum forming. MB4000 Foundry Red Board can be polished to a high gloss for use with clear and ultra-clear vacuum forming materials.

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