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2/1/2011

Direct sizing system for E-glass

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AGY’s new 947 direct sizing system, developed for E-glass used primarily in aerospace applications, can be woven into fabric and used in composite applications without additional finishing.

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AGY’s (Aiken, S.C.) new 947 direct sizing system, developed for E-glass used primarily in aerospace applications, can be woven into fabric and used in composite applications without additional finishing. Yarns produced with the size are said to have significantly higher tensile strengths than comparable yarns coated with traditional oil and starch sizes. Moreover, fabrics made from 947-coated yarns need not undergo heat treatments or other cleaning processes that can erode fabric integrity. According to the company, unidirectional laminates manufactured with the yarn and a standard general-purpose epoxy resin have an ASTM 3039 tensile strength of 200 ksi/1379 MPa and an ASTM D3410 compressive strength of 125 ksi/862 MPa. These figures represent improvements of 40 and 45 percent, respectively, over conventional E-glass products. Compatible not only with epoxy but also phenolic and thermoplastic resins, the size reportedly has the potential to be used in hybrid glass/carbon fiber fabrics. Initially available on AGY’s DE75 yarn, the size will be offered in other yarns soon.

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