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CompositesWorld New Products for Nov. 26, 2019

The latest technology from Thermwood, and Sandvik Coromant
#adhesives #airbus #outofautoclave

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Fixed-gantry options for large-scale additive manufacturing

Thermwood’s LSAM MT, the latest model of is large-scale additive manufacturing machine, features a single fixed gantry mounted over a moving table.

Thermwood large scale additive manufacturing machine for composite 3D printing

Source | Thermwood

Thermwood’s (Dale, Ind., U.S.) LSAM MT, the latest model of is large-scale additive manufacturing (LSAM) machine, features a single fixed gantry mounted over a moving table (MT stands for “moving table”). Available with either a 10 × 5-ft. or a 10 × 10-ft. work station, this configuration is said to provide a lower priced option compared to dual-gantry/fixed-table LSAM systems.

According to Thermowood, the LSAM MT is a robust industrial production machine capable of reliable, day-in and day-out production. Both “Print and Trim” and “Print Only” versions of the system are available. Thermwood says the “Print Only” configuration was designed for companies that do not need to add machining capacity with their additive system.

Thermwood large scale additive manufacturing machine for composite 3D printing

Source | Thermwood

The 10 × 10 machine includes a 10 × 12-ft. table with a 10 × 10-ft. working area. The extra 2 ft. are used to mount an optional vertical layer print table, meaning the machine can make parts up to 10-ft. wide × 10-ft. deep  × 5-ft. high using traditional horizontal layer printing, or 5-ft. wide × 10-ft. deep × 10-ft. high using vertical layer printing.

The print technology and print heads used on the MT are the same as used on the larger machines, enabling the same throughput, print quality and layer to layer fusion. As with the larger systems, the MT can process high-temperature polymers ideal for autoclave-capable tooling or compression molds.

 

Thermwood recommends its smaller, less expensive MT option for use with parts, regardless of size, made from bondable materials like reinforced thermoplastic composite materials for room- or low-temperature applications such as foundry patterns, boat plugs, boat and yacht molds, and building structures. According to Thermwood, it can be faster to print these types of parts in sections, which allows more time for each individual section and layer to cool, and then bond the final part together using industrial adhesives. The smaller MT machine can also accommodate smaller high-temperature parts.

Thermwood recommends its larger MT machine for materials that cannot be bonded effectively — such as PSU, PESU, PEI and Ultem — that are either resistant to solvents or used at temperatures too high for adhesives to withstand and must be printed in one piece. The larger machine configuration also enables printing and trimming the part at the same time. 




Graphene-enhanced prepreg launched for lightning strike protection

Haydale's range of graphene-enhanced prepreg materials utilize functionalized nanomaterials to improve the electrical conductivity in aerospace applications.

graphene enhanced prepreg for lightning strike protection

Source | Haydale

Haydale (Ammanford, U.K.) has launched a range of graphene-enhanced prepreg material for lightning strike protection, utilizing functionalized nanomaterials to improve the electrical conductivity. The material can be used for structural components or for enclosures for electronic avionics systems.

According to Haydale, the material also has potential applications for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV), commercial aviation or space applications, or offshore wind turbine blades. 

The material has been developed in collaboration with Airbus UK (Bristol), BAE Systems (Farnborough, U.K.), GE Aviation (Evendale, Ohio, U.S.) and Element Materials Technology Warwick Ltd. (Warwick, U.K.), within the U.K.’s National Aerospace Technology Programme (NATEP)-supported GraCELs 2[1] project, where the first iterations of materials were developed and subjected to lighting strike tests. The consortium is now looking to manufacture a demonstrator component using the developed materials to establish composite manufacturing protocols for commercial purposes.

An electrically conductive masterbatch is also commercially available, and the Haydale team has been working with customers to test the capability achieving significant results over existing materials.




Solid carbide drill designed for aerospace composites

Sandvik Coromant’s CoroDrill 863 solid carbide drill with -O geometry has been designed to improve drilling consistency and performance on composite aerospace workpieces.

Sandvik CarboDrill 863 for drilling composites for aerospace

Source | Sandvik Coromant

 

Cutting tool and tooling system specialist Sandvik Coromant’s (Fair Lawn, N.J., U.S.) CoroDrill 863 solid carbide drill with -O geometry has been designed to improve consistency and performance during hole-making operations on composite aerospace workpieces. The drill is said to extend tool life and achieve high hole integrity, and has been specifically designed to combat potential delamination issues caused by drilling. The substrate is based on a new grade, O1AD, which is said to improve wear resistance. A high axial rake angle is included for reduced delamination in unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP). 

According to Sandvik, tool life is improved significantly when using the CoroDrill 863 drill, with increases in material drilled often measured in meters. As a result, fewer tool changes are needed. 

Composite applications include aircraft frames, wingboxes, fuselage sections, stabilizers, floor beams and flaps. The assortment is available from 4xD to 5xD, in diameters from 3-10 mm (0.118-0.393").

Sandvik CarboDrill 863 for drilling composites for aerospace

Source | Sandvik Coromant