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4/30/2014 | 1 MINUTE READ

Carbon fiber, prepreg, epoxy resin

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Hexcel introduced several new products in Paris. Topping the list is high-modulus HexTow HM63 carbon fiber.

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Hexcel (Stamford, Conn.) introduced several new products in Paris. Topping the list is high-modulus HexTow HM63 carbon fiber. With what Hexcel says is the “highest tensile strength of any HM fiber,” HM63 reportedly provides good translation of fiber properties in a composite, including very good interlaminar shear and compression shear strength. Targeted to high-stiffness and strength-critical applications (satellites, unmanned aerial vehicles, commercial airplanes and helicopters) it also meets the special requirements for premium sports and recreation applications, including Formula 1, marine craft, bikes and fishing rods.

New HexPly M92, a “multipurpose” 125°C/257°F-cure epoxy prepreg, offers hot/wet Tg performance of 115°C/239°F, enabling it to operate at higher service temperatures from a lower-cost 125°C/257°F cure. The system is self-adhesive to honeycomb and fire resistant, exhibits low exotherm, has a long out/tack life and is compatible with vacuum-bag cure.

HexPly M77 is a rapid-curing epoxy prepreg that allows automotive components and sporting goods to be press-cured in a two-minute cycle at 150°C/302°F (80 bar pressure). It features low tack, which allows the prepreg to be cut by laser cutter. Once in the mold, HexPly M77’s “optimized” gel time allows the resin to flow into contours to produce the geometries required. Tg of 125°C/257°F enables cured parts to be demolded while hot to speed production. 

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