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CAMX 2019 exhibit preview: SurfEllent

SurfEllent is featuring its anti-icing coatings, which are designed for high mechanical, chemical and environmental durability at a low cost.
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anti-icing coating

Source | SurfEllent

 

SurfEllent (Houston, Texas, U.S.) is featuring its anti-icing coatings, which are designed for high mechanical, chemical and environmental durability at a low cost.

According to the company, anti-icing plays a critical role in protecting infrastructures, transportation, energy systems, and aircraft turbomachinery against the detrimental effects of icing. Despite the importance of anti-icing, the company says most coatings are ineffective for ice repellency and long-term durability.

SurfEllent's anti-icing coating technology is in the form of a liquid that reportedly can be applied to any surface, including polymers and ceramics. The liquid material can be packed in both cans and spray bottles depending on the desired end-use. The liquid coating in cans is applied through brushing, while the spray form is directly applied to a surface. Once applied on the surface, the liquid is said to cure in less than an hour, forming a solid and highly durable coating. 

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