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7/25/2019

CAMX 2019 exhibit preview: Dexmet

Originally titled 'Thin-gauge perforated polymers and foils'
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Dexmet is introducing thin-gauge perforated foils and polymers to its product lineup of expanded foils.

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CAMX 2019 Dexmet perforated foils and polymers

Source | Dexmet

 

Dexmet (Wallingford, Conn., U.S.) is introducing thin-gauge perforated foils and polymers to its product lineup of expanded foils. The new perforated products were developed as the result of the need for thinner, lighter materials. 

The company says its ultra-thin perforated materials are versatile, open-area materials offering strength and functionality for applications where weight, conductivity and controlled openings are crucial for performance. 

The perforated thin-gauge materials are designed to meet critical specifications in industries such as aerospace, energy, electronics, automotive and filtration. Dexmet says its new materials are thinner (specializing in sub-200 μm, or .008") as well as wider (up to 1.6 m, or 63") compared to other materials. Other benefits are said to include open areas between 1% and 35%, and increased tensile strength. Dexmet can accommodate needs for materials with solid borders or interrupts, and provides m​​​​​​ultiple hole shapes and patterns for optimizing electrical, mechanical or filtering properties. 

CAMX 2019 Exhibitor

Dexmet Corp.

Exhibit Hall, Booth N54

View Showroom | Register Here

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