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CAMX 2019 exhibit preview: Accudyne Systems

Appears in Print as: 'Custom automation equipment'


Accudyne Systems is highlighting its custom automation equipment for producing intermediary materials, preforms and finished parts.
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Accudyne CAMX 2019 automation

Source | Accudyne

Accudyne Systems (Newark, Del., U.S.) is highlighting its custom automation equipment for producing intermediary materials, preforms and finished parts.

The company designs and manufactures part-specific equipment to automate difficult and/or labor-intensive processes. Accudyine’s technical staff develop solutions that enhance the quality, productivity and profitability of customers’ products.  Specialty areas include development, prototype demonstration and full-scale equipment manufacturing. 

Areas of expertise are said to include pick & place, shape forming, compaction/debulking, tape and tow placement, multifunctional machines and converting equipment. 

Accudyne’s typical project phases emcompass development, engineering design, fabrication, systems integration, start-up and support. Booth U58. 

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