• PT Youtube
  • CW Facebook
  • CW Linkedin
  • CW Twitter
8/30/2016 | 1 MINUTE READ

CAMX 2016 preview: UCLA Department of Architecture and Urban Design

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

The UCLA Department of Architecture & Urban Design (A.UD; Los Angeles, California) are featuring a composite architectural structure that won first place in the American Composites Manufacturers Association’s (ACMA) first ever Composites in Architecture Design Challenge at the American Institute of Architects’ 2016 Convention in Philadelphia.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

The UCLA Department of Architecture & Urban Design (A.UD; Los Angeles, California) are featuring a composite architectural structure that won first place in the American Composites Manufacturers Association’s (ACMA) first ever Composites in Architecture Design Challenge at the American Institute of Architects’ 2016 Convention in Philadelphia. For the challenge, ACMA’s Architectural Division asked students to work in teams to develop an innovative composite architectural/building component or assembly. The teams were encouraged to explore and invent new, and sometimes radical, architectural designs. UCLA’s winning “Undulating Gills” entry was created by UCLA architecture students Anna Kudashkina, Yifan Wu, Yuekan Yu, Shahr Razi, Simi Shenoy, and Marcelo Marcos, who worked on the project under the direction of SUPRASTUDIO lecturer Julia Koerner within a technology seminar known as Animated Fibers. The team’s project incorporated composite fabrication of “mega-panels” while integrating robotic technology to fabricate panels without a mold. The result was a twisting structure that creates a “parametric relationship between a series of panels to allow for lighting control on a facade.” The team’s main technique was to twist and robotically manipulate a single infusion bag with several panels inside. This reduced the amount of time and material in the fabrication process. Other advantages of mass production robotic controlled infusion are the ability to control precise form changes and increased possibility for onsite building.

RELATED CONTENT

  • Supersonic flight goes commercial, again

    Boom Technology describes its program to validate a cost-effective faster-than-sound airliner.

  • Composites recycling becomes a necessity

    Boeing and Airbus each is generating as much as a 1 million lb of cured and uncured carbon fiber prepreg waste each year from 787 and A350 XWB production. If you include the entire supply chain for these planes, the total is closer to 4 million lb/year. And with the automotive industry poised to consume (and waste) more carbon fiber than ever, recycling of composite materials has become an absolute necessity. The technology is there, but the markets are not. Yet.

  • HP-RTM on the rise

    Decades of development have propelled it to prominence but its future demands industrial solutions for handling cost, complexity and process control.

Resources