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8/30/2016

CAMX 2016 preview: Rubbercraft Inc.

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Rubbercraft Inc. (Long Beach, California), an operating business of the Integrated Polymer Solutions Group, is introducing its new extractable bladder tooling technology.

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Rubbercraft Inc. (Long Beach, California), an operating business of the Integrated Polymer Solutions Group, is introducing its new extractable bladder tooling technology. The Tri-layer Bladder is designed to reduce the risk of damage from gas leakage, and provides in-process monitoring. The Tri-layer Bladder integrates a breather within the bladder construction, offering protection against leaks. It also features a purpose-designed vent plug that terminates the bladder, with provision to evacuate in-process leaked gas and to allow a gas connection to pressurize the bladder.

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