• PT Youtube
  • CW Facebook
  • CW Linkedin
  • CW Twitter
8/1/2016

CAMX 2016 preview: Niabraze LLC

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Niabraze (Tonawanda, NY, US) is featuring its line of superabrasive electroplated and brazed products to cut, mill and grind hard materials, including composites.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Related Suppliers

Niabraze LLC (Tonawanda, NY, US) is featuring its line of superabrasive electroplated and brazed products to cut, mill and grind hard materials, including composites. Electroplated tooling’s high diamond exposure is said to provide a free, fast cutting action with better removal rates and less thermal damage than conventional tooling. Niabraze notes that with brazed tooling, superabrasives are chemically bonded to the substrate, making the diamonds part of the tool. This allows for a high-performance, efficient and aggressive tool that can withstand higher rotation speeds and heat during the grinding and cutting process Products include band saw blades, circular saws from 1 inche to 49 inches in diameter, mounted wheels, hole saws and router bits.

RELATED CONTENT

  • Additive manufacturing comes to composites fabrication

    The use of continuous fiber in additive manufacturing systems is not trivial, but it is being done. As this fabrication technology evolves and matures, options for applying it in everything from automotive to aerospace to consumer composites will expand tremendously, creating a host of new opportunities for the composites industry. Read here for who is providing what kind of additive manufacturing technology for use in composites fabrication.

  • Preforming goes industrial: Part 1

    ATL and AFP-based preforming options now abound for processing dry and/or impregnated reinforcements as quickly as 1 minute or less with potential yearly part yields in the millions.

  • Composites recycling becomes a necessity

    Boeing and Airbus each is generating as much as a 1 million lb of cured and uncured carbon fiber prepreg waste each year from 787 and A350 XWB production. If you include the entire supply chain for these planes, the total is closer to 4 million lb/year. And with the automotive industry poised to consume (and waste) more carbon fiber than ever, recycling of composite materials has become an absolute necessity. The technology is there, but the markets are not. Yet.

Related Topics

Resources