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8/1/2016

CAMX 2016 preview: CPIC Fiberglass

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Chongqing Polycomp International Corp. (CPIC, Chongqing, China) is featuring its fiberglass products, including E-glass.

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Chongqing Polycomp International Corp. (CPIC, Chongqing, China) is featuring its fiberglass products, including E-glass. Products include textile yarn and a variety of reinforcements such as rovings, mats (emulsion/powder binder), woven rovings, multiaxial fabrics, chopped strands, long fiber for thermoplastics and other products. ECR is designed for chemical resistance, ECT is designed for corosion resistance, and TM is for high-performance use in wind blade, high-pressure pipe and high-strength profile applications. HT glass fiber provides a boron-free and fluoride-free solution and HL glass fiber provides a low dielectric constant for use in the electromagnetic wave and high-frequency electronic circuit field.

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