• PT Youtube
  • CW Facebook
  • CW Linkedin
  • CW Twitter
8/1/2016

CAMX 2016 preview: Bostik Inc.

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Bostik (Wauwatosa, Wisconsin), a division of Arkema and global industrial adhesives supplier, is featuring its range of adhesive solutions, including hot melt adhesives as well as web and film adhesives for use in the composites market.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Related Suppliers

Bostik Inc. (Wauwatosa, Wisconsin), a division of Arkema and global industrial adhesives supplier, is featuring its range of adhesive solutions, including hot melt adhesives as well as web and film adhesives for use in the composites market. The Supergrip line of hot melt polyurethane adhesives offers strength and flexibility. Bostik’s hot melt polyolefin adhesives provide a potential bonding solution for applications using olefinic substrates, requiring variable open times or high-temperature resistance. Web adhesives are a nonwoven thermoplastic manufactured from a variety of polymers, including polyester and nylon. The Sharnet product line includes fire retardant (FR) web products, like SH4275FR-A and SPA145FR-A, which are designed for skin-to-core bonding in the aerospace market. On the film side, F10-316 is a non-FR thermoset polyester film with a low activation temperature and good flow properties. For composite systems that do not require fire retardancy, F10-316 offers a means of delivering adhesive without the cold-storage requirements of traditional high-strength films. Bostik’s F14-588 film is an FR, pressure-sensitive film adhesive for applications where high shear strength is required and fire retardancy is necessary, including aerospace interior applications. Senior business development leader Shawn Cissell will give a presentation at CAMX on adhesive selection for sandwich panel construction.

RELATED CONTENT

  • Preforming goes industrial: Part 1

    ATL and AFP-based preforming options now abound for processing dry and/or impregnated reinforcements as quickly as 1 minute or less with potential yearly part yields in the millions.

  • Composites recycling: Gaining traction

    Recycling of carbon fiber, glass fiber and — at last — resins, is growing as new players enter the space.

  • Composites 101: Fibers and resins

    Compared to legacy materials like steel, aluminum, iron and titanium, composites are still coming of age, and only just now are being better understood by design and manufacturing engineers. However, composites’ physical properties — combined with unbeatable light weight — make them undeniably attractive. 

Related Topics

Resources