• PT Youtube
  • CW Facebook
  • CW Linkedin
  • CW Twitter
7/21/2016

CAMX 2016 preview: Airtech Advanced Materials

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Airtech Advanced Materials (Huntington Beach, CA, US) will feature its BBH 1080 autoclave hose.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Related Suppliers

Airtech Advanced Materials (Huntington Beach, CA, US) will feature its BBH 1080 autoclave hose at CAMX 2016. The BBH 1080 is a durable high temperature and high pressure autoclave hose. The hose construction consists of an inner flexible stainless steel conduit over-wrapped with a stainless steel braid. A stainless steel armor jacket covers the hose and protects it from the harsh autoclave and production environment. Click here for a video of the hose.  

RELATED CONTENT

  • Composites 101: Fibers and resins

    Compared to legacy materials like steel, aluminum, iron and titanium, composites are still coming of age, and only just now are being better understood by design and manufacturing engineers. However, composites’ physical properties — combined with unbeatable light weight — make them undeniably attractive. 

  • Is the BMW 7 Series the future of autocomposites?

    BMW AG's Dingolfing, Germany, auto manufacturing facility is well known for churning out a variety of car models and types, and the 7 Series is among them, famous for its steel/aluminum/composites construction. Does this car represent the optimum of composites use in vehiicles? This plant tour of the Dingolfing plant looks at how composites on the 7 Series come together.

  • Composites recycling becomes a necessity

    Boeing and Airbus each is generating as much as a 1 million lb of cured and uncured carbon fiber prepreg waste each year from 787 and A350 XWB production. If you include the entire supply chain for these planes, the total is closer to 4 million lb/year. And with the automotive industry poised to consume (and waste) more carbon fiber than ever, recycling of composite materials has become an absolute necessity. The technology is there, but the markets are not. Yet.

Related Topics

Resources