• PT Youtube
  • CW Facebook
  • CW Linkedin
  • CW Twitter
10/5/2015

CAMX 2015 preview: National Research Council Canada

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

The National Research Council (NRC), Canada’s industrial innovation and research and development organization, will highlight its new autoclave and high-temperature convection oven.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

The National Research Council (NRC), Canada’s industrial innovation and research and development organization, will highlight its new autoclave and high-temperature convection oven. The new autoclave combines high-accuracy sensors with a sophisticated control system to precisely and flexibly process all available polymer matrix composite materials. This new equipment supplements NRC’s existing 420°C, 2070 kPa autoclave, which measures1.8m by 6m. Additionally, NRC’s new high-temperature convection oven, coupled with a high-accuracy, multi-step control system will allow research into the post-curing of large composite articles in conjunction with the autoclave system. It will also allow for out-of-autoclave processing of composites including those processed on NRC’s conductive heating test bed. The oven includes thermocouple instrumentation, as well as vacuum and resin pass-through lines for infusion processing and secondary bonding operations. It operates at 540°C and will handle specimens up 1.3 by 1.3 by 1.3m.

During the conference, NRC will present a research paper, titled, "Boron Nitride Nanotube Composites and Their Propertie,"s which introduces boron nitride nanotubes, their potential composites applications, a scalable production method and selected composites examples. M.B. Jakubinek of NRC will present the paper at CAMX 2015 on Tuesday Oct. 27 at 2:00 pm. 

RELATED CONTENT

  • Supersonic flight goes commercial, again

    Boom Technology describes its program to validate a cost-effective faster-than-sound airliner.

  • Composites 101: Fibers and resins

    Compared to legacy materials like steel, aluminum, iron and titanium, composites are still coming of age, and only just now are being better understood by design and manufacturing engineers. However, composites’ physical properties — combined with unbeatable light weight — make them undeniably attractive. 

  • Is the BMW 7 Series the future of autocomposites?

    BMW AG's Dingolfing, Germany, auto manufacturing facility is well known for churning out a variety of car models and types, and the 7 Series is among them, famous for its steel/aluminum/composites construction. Does this car represent the optimum of composites use in vehiicles? This plant tour of the Dingolfing plant looks at how composites on the 7 Series come together.

Related Topics

Resources