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8/20/2015

CAMX 2015 preview: Hennecke

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Hennecke (Lawrence, PA, US) will feature the latest developments in its line of polyurethane composite fabrication technology.

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Hennecke (Lawrence, PA, US) will feature the latest developments in its line of polyurethane composite fabrication technology. Of particular interest will be a high-performance carbon fiber-aluminium hybrid automobile wheel rim, manufactured with the Hennecke's STREAMLINE high-pressure metering system for high-pressure resin transfer molding (HP-RTM) applications. Apart from a high-end surface structure, such rims offer an enormous weight reduction of between 25 and 30% over conventional rims made of forged aluminium. The result is not only lower consumption, but also noticeably improved driving dynamics. With the HP-RTM process, Hennecke says it has created a tool that offers considerable advantages in terms of efficiency and product quality, especially when it comes to producing large volumes economically. Other parts and technologies in the Hennecke booth include: Audi R8 automotive dashboard shell made with reaction injection molding (RIM) and composite spraymolding (CSM); honeycomb composite automotive load floors; a CLEARMELT demonstration part; a polyurethane spray skin foam seat cushion; a Varysoft composite automotive part made via HP-RTM; long fiber siding panels; an automotive leaf spring made via the STREAMLINE RTM process; the MN 10 mixhead for high-pressure spray; an MN 6 mixhead for polyurethane spray; and constant pressure injectors. 

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