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10/6/2015

CAMX 2015 preview: Concordia Fibers

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Concordia Fibers (Coventry, RI, US) is featuring its line of engineered yarns and fibers for producing a broad range of technical fabrics.

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Concordia Fibers (Coventry, RI, US) is featuring its line of engineered yarns and fibers for producing a broad range of technical fabrics. Concordia has developed several of its own machines to convert a variety of fragile fibers including unsized carbon fiber, bio-absorbable fibers and ceramic fibers. Concordia has designed and developed two processes for converting fibers for advanced composites: high-volume carbon twisting and commingling. Commingling is a process for producing highly flexible thermoplastic prepregs. Concordia’s process intimately blends unsized continuous filament carbon fiber with unsized continuous filament thermoplastic fibers to produce a yarn that can be woven or braided into fabrics. These commingled fabrics can then be molded into complex thermoplastic composite shapes or tubes. Twisting is used during the weaving process and adds very low levels of highly consistent twist to each warp end allows the individual fibers to move past each other in the loom without damage. Concordia has developed custom machines for this purpose and can twist carbon fiber sizes ranging from 1k to 156k tow. 

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