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10/4/2015

CAMX 2015 preview: Chesapeake Testing

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Chesapeake Testing (Belcamp, Maryland) is emphasizing its testing services, performed with what the company says is one of the largest CT scanners in the world.

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Chesapeake Testing (Belcamp, Maryland) is emphasizing its testing services, performed with what the company says is one of the largest CT scanners in the world. Due to its size and high resolution scanning, Chesapeake says its CT scanner has proven to be integral in the development of numerous industrial products. Industrial XCT scanning, much like medical CAT scanning, acquires multiple x-ray projection images 360° around an object. These images are then reconstructed into a full 3D volumetric data set. Because no human patient is exposed in the industrial XCT scanner, higher levels of radiation are used (benign to most test samples) to allow for greater penetration though denser materials, and higher resolution data than typical medical scans can provide.

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