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8/29/2014

CAMX 2014 preview: THINKY USA

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THINKY USA Corp. (Laguna Hills, Calif., USA) is introducing the THINKY ARE-310, a new mixing technology, co-developed with Tokyo University of Science, Department of Applied Chemistry, for carbon nanotube (CNT) dispersion in a resin matrix.

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THINKY USA Corp. (Laguna Hills, Calif., USA) is introducing the THINKY ARE-310, a new mixing technology, co-developed with Tokyo University of Science, Department of Applied Chemistry, for carbon nanotube (CNT) dispersion in a resin matrix. The THINKY ARE-310 does not use a propeller or media for mixing, but instead uses centrifugal force and can disperse materials softly without any damage to the resin or CNTs. The THINKY ARE-310 mixer reportedly can disperse CNTs uniformly without shearing, thereby enhancing resin conductivity.

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