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8/29/2014

CAMX 2014 preview: Spintech

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The Smart Tooling division of Spintech LLC (Xenia, Ohio, USA) will feature its Smart Bladder and Smart Mandrel Tooling solutions at CAMX.

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The Smart Tooling division of Spintech LLC (Xenia, Ohio, USA) will feature its Smart Bladder and Smart Mandrel Tooling solutions at CAMX. Products include Smart Bladders and Smart Mandrels for hat stiffeners, blade spars, D spars, stringers, control cuffs and more.  Smart Tooling will also show a Smart Bladder as cast into a memory shape, with representative formed part shapes with 10 percent, 20 center, and 40 percent strain characteristics.

Smart Mandrels are formable tools that are rigid during composite part curing, and flexible above cure temperature. The composite is applied on the formed Smart Mandrel and cured per specification. The temperature is then elevated above the activation temperature of the Smart Mandrel, allowing the now-flexible tool to easily be removed from the cured part.

Smart Bladders act as rigid mandrels during layup, and inflatable bladders during part cure. After the composite is applied to the rigid bladder, the Smart Bladder is placed in a curing mold. The mold is heated above the activation temperature of the bladder and inflated for composite part consolidation during cure.  Once pressure is removed, the flexible Smart Bladder is removed from the cured part.

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