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8/29/2014

CAMX 2014 preview: Nordson SEALANT EQUIPMENT

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Nordson SEALANT EQUIPMENT (Plymouth, Mich., USA) is displaying its positive rod displacement meter system, designed to provide composite manufacturers with high-precision dispensing of adhesives and sealants.

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Nordson SEALANT EQUIPMENT (Plymouth, Mich., USA) is displaying its positive rod displacement meter system, designed to provide composite manufacturers with high-precision dispensing of adhesives and sealants. Positive rod displacement metering systems for two-component composite materials are available from 0.2 cc up to 1,400 cc. Precision composite dispensing systems are fixed-ratio, from 1:1 to 10:1 and higher. Continuous flow metering systems are also available for larger volumes and continuous dispensing applications. Nordson SEALANT EQUIPMENT will also show its new Dual Cartridge Dispensing System for robotic dispensing of pre-mixed aircraft adhesives and sealants directly from cartridges. This new product is said to be ideal for robotically applying aircraft sealants in fuselage and wing environments where manual dispensing is currently performed.

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