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8/28/2014

CAMX 2014 preview: Impact Composites

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Impact Composites (Erlanger, Ky., USA) will highlight the benefits of using thermoplastic matrix composites to improve part performance using continuous fibers.

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Impact Composites (Erlanger, Ky., USA) will highlight the benefits of using thermoplastic matrix composites to improve part performance using continuous fibers. Impact Composites will feature parts that showcase the company’s compression and bladder molding, thermoforming and welding technologies using continuous fiber thermoplastic composites. Material combinations that can be used for these molding technologies include polypropylene (PP), Polyamides (PA), polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), polyetheretherketone (PEEK), fiberglass, and carbon fiber. Benefits of these materials include ease of recyclability, impact toughness, temperature performance, chemical resistance and low FST (flame, smoke, toxicity). Impact composites fabricates parts for the sporting goods, oil & gas, aerospace, electronics and medical markets.

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