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10/6/2014

CAMX 2014 preview: Fibrtec

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Fibrtec Inc. (Atlanta, Texas) is announcing its plans to increase capacity to meet the market demand for its polypropylene (PP)/fiberglass- and PP/carbon fiber-based Fibrflex family of products.

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Fibrtec Inc. (Atlanta, Texas) is announcing its plans to increase capacity to meet the market demand for its polypropylene (PP)/fiberglass- and PP/carbon fiber-based Fibrflex family of products. Fibrflex is a flexible, continuous thermoplastic composite prepreg with resin content tailorable to meet the needs of the target application, with fiber volume fractions of 50 to 60 percent. Fibrflex is offered as a woven fabric, filament wound, braided, a laminate or as a pultruded shape. The Fibrflex manufacturing process is adaptable for use with E-glass, carbon and aramid in all available tow sizes, making it suitable for complex structures. The material is adaptable for use with tailored fiber placement (TFP) in a combination that Fibrtec says is "disruptive" as it exceeds what was previously possible with traditional material and methods for structural solutions. 

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