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10/6/2014

CAMX 2014 preview: Electron Heat

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Electron Heat (Lugoff, S.C.), which offers composites curing technologies based on radio-frequency (RF) radiation, is exhibiting samples cured using its equipment.

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Electron Heat (Lugoff, S.C.), which offers composites curing technologies based on radio-frequency (RF) radiation, is exhibiting samples cured using its equipment. Parts manufactured via resin transfer molding (RTM), vacuum bagging and casting will be featured. Also on display will be a carbon fiber prepreg cured out of autoclave, a polyester casting 2.5 inches thick cured in 8 minutes, and a 10-ply fiberglass hand layup with epoxy resin cured in less than 5 minutes. A feasibility survey at www.electronheat.com can help confirm if an application can be cured with this new technology. Electron Heat also has an entry in the CAMX Awards.

In the conference, Andrew George of Brigham Young University will present "RF vs Oven Cure of Polyester Resins: Cure Extent, Peak Exotherm, and Part Strength," Wednesday, Oct. 15, 8:30 a.m.

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