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8/28/2014 | 1 MINUTE READ

CAMX 2014 preview: Eastman Machine

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Eastman Machine Co. (Buffalo, N.Y., USA) will introduce at CAMX a new automatic cutting system model and demonstrate several composites-configured manual cutting machines.

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Eastman Machine Co. (Buffalo, N.Y., USA) will introduce at CAMX a new automatic cutting system model and demonstrate several composites-configured manual cutting machines. Daily cutting demonstrations will take place in booth 2059. The Eagle S125 Static Table Cutting System is a solution for R&D or production cutting of nested pattern pieces from dry and pre-preg composite materials in sheet or rolled form. The S125 is engineered with an industrial design for rigorous use, including an advanced electro-pneumatic regulator for precise tool pressure control; built-in surge protection; heavy-duty cable connectors; and a heavy-gauge steel construction with scratch-resistant powder-coated finish. The operating computer and control cabinet are housed in independent enclosures that are sealed to provide dust and water protection in harsh or high-particulate environments. Additionally, cabling connectors, servomotors and display components meet recognized international protection ratings requirements. The Eagle S125 may be configured in various widths and lengths to match customer requirements. A range of tool head accessory options for marking and printing, plus various cutting surfaces, are available to optimize cutting results for any given material.

Eastman’s line of manually operated cutting machines will also be available for demonstrations, configured for composites applications. Model features are developed in response to new and high-tech materials cutting requirements. Eastman says its manual cutting machines feature many of the same benefits as automatic cutting, at a much lower investment.

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